Prosecutors, Police, and Defense Attorneys often talk about a “Giglio File” or a particular officer having “Giglio Issues.”  The term “Giglio,” pronounced gig-leo, comes from the landmark U.S. Supreme Court cases Giglio v. United States, 405 U.S. 150 (1972) and Brady v. Maryland, 373 U.S. 83 (1963). Essentially, prosecutors  and the police must disclose evidence favorable to the accused’s case. This includes information that may be used to impeach the credibility of police officers, particularly the arresting officer. This Supreme Court precedent means that officers who have lied during internal affairs or official actions, falsified reports, or expressed discriminatory biases may be prevented from testifying; this means material evidence may be suppressed and may ultimately prevent the prosecution of the accused for a particular crime…